Colon Cancer Survival

Colon cancer prognosis depends greatly on the stage of the tumor at diagnosis. In general, when the cancer is detected early, you have more chance to survive. If your colon cancer is diagnosed at stage 1, your 5-year survival rate can be 90%.

According to the National Cancer institute (NCI), the overall 5-year relative survival rate for 1999-2005 was 65.2%. However, survival rates tend to vary by race and sex:

  • 66.3% for white men
  • 65.9% for white women
  • 56.7% for black women
  • 55.5% for black men.

Death Rates by age  

From 2002-2006, the median age at death for cancer of the colon and rectum in the US was 75 years of age:

  • 0.0%  died under age 20
  • 0.6% between 20 and 34
  • 2.4% between 35 and 44
  • 8.0% between 45 and 54
  • 15.2% between 55 and 64
  • 22.6% between 65 and 74
  • 30.8% between 75 and 84
  • 20.4% 85+ years of age.

Death Rates by Race 

The age-adjusted death rate was 18.2 per 100,000 men and women per year. These rates are based on patients who died in 2002-2006 in the US.

Race/Ethnicity Male Female
White 21.4 per 100,000 14.9 per 100,000
Black 31.4 per 100,000 21.6 per 100,000
Asian/Pacific Islander 13.8 per 100,000 10.0 per 100,000
American Indian/Alaska Native 20.0 per 100,000 13.7 per 100,000
Hispanic 16.1 per 100,000 10.7 per 100,000
All Races 21.9 per 100,000 15.4 per 100,000

                         Treatment                                                                         Prevention

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